Renee Sonnichsen – Hardwear

Based in Portland, Oregon, the company is owned and operated by Renee Sonnichsen, an artist and designer. She strives to create a line of strong, sexy, and smart handbags that easily transition from day to evenings. Inspired by her vision of today’s woman, the line of handbags proves durability need not be dowdy, nor femininity fussy and fragile, that’s hardwear, and that’s you.

Christine Hartsock

CEH Creations jewelry is made with glasses and beads from Japan and the Czech Republic and a braided fishing line.

CEH Creations was started in 2007 by Christine Heartsick. After 32 years in the world of finance, it was time to take a more creative route.

All pieces are hand woven, using traditional bead weaving methods but with non-traditional materials. Glass, metal, gemstone and hardware components are woven to create unique jewelry. CEH Creations jewelry is made with glasses and beads from Japan and the Czech Republic and a braided fishing line.

Zach Jonas

We feel fortunate to have met Jonas at the Smithonian and Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Shows.  His work is the definition of handmade and one of a kind at it’s best.

“The art of the bladesmith is a deeply satisfying experience. It is both challenging and elemental in nature, requiring intense heat, considerable strength and focus, and an acute personal bond with the materials at hand. Without any one of these, there can be no knife. As such, the craft both offers and demands a reverence for the history and tradition of making and using edged implements. I hope to write my own small chapter into this history, to continue and expand the ancient art of knife making, and to produce exceptional blades in the process.” Zach Jonas

Raymond Bock

Starting out a designer and photographer, Raymond studied at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he graduated with a BA in Design.  Moving over from photography to woodwork, he has showed at a number of national crafts and arts shows.  His most current interests include making sculptural vessels, and his beautiful boxes.

Muffy Young

“I have been a handweaver and dyer since 1978. These scarves and shawls are all hand woven and hand dyed. My loom has 24 harnesses instead of the more usual 4 or 8. This allows me to design highly complex structures, and to combine them in a single piece for intriguing variations in scale, texture, and motif. My designs are original, unique, and innovative, with images inspired by nature, modernism, and the fabrics of Latin American, Central Asia, and Africa. Guided by the weave structure, I select silk fibers to maximize visual impact and to balance drape and stability. Hand-dying my yarns gives me complete control of my color palette. My passion is to create refined scarves and shawls that are beautiful to look at and comfortable to wear.”
-Muffy Young

Jake Johnson

“I think I was drawn to clay because of its working properties; Clay is a very squishy, soft, malleable material. These are qualities which I fully embrace and exploit in making my pieces. By giving my work just some of the basic qualities of life–a sense of movement, growth, and breath—the pieces develop presence and take on unique personalities and trajectories. I strive to give a feeling of animation to my work that suggests gesture. This speaks to the inspiration for many of my forms and surfaces, which is drawn from nature. I spend a lot of time in the woods, hiking, looking for mushrooms, and finding plenty of other things along the way. The variety and diversity of life that I encounter finds its way into my work.

“For me, working for myself and making things with my hands makes me feel more grounded and perhaps more human. My work is not rooted in a particular tradition or style, but rather a tempo or mood that I think comes from some combination of my personality and my interest in nature and biology. I try to make works that engage users visually and tactfully, while also fulfilling a purpose for the user. While I’ve gone through many styles and types of work, I think that feeling of animation and energy has remained constant, and it is this which I view as the defining characteristic of what I produce.”
Jake Johnson

Shirley Groman

“From the day I first walked into the ceramic studio as an undergraduate student clay has captivated me with the possiblities of combining the 3-D form with 2-D imagery. The imagery in my work is influenced by life in and around the Chesapeake Bay where I grew up. The pieces are narratives of imagined gatherings of the sealife found in the bay and act as vehicles for telling stories of life on
the bay.

“The forms are thrown or handbuilt with a cone 6 porcelain clay body. The general design is drawn on the leather hard clay then the piece is painted with a black terra sigliatta. I then use an a variety of tools to scratch away the black sig revealing the white clay body. The work is the bisque fired to cone 06. The piece is then glazed and fired to cone 6.”
Shirley Groman

Thomas Arakawa

“I aspire to make unique functional pottery that reflect myself, fit American life style, and enrich customers everyday life. I would like to keep making handmade pottery so that customers can relate my work to me as person. As I am making pottery I think about how individual customers use my pieces and how it affects their life. This gives me a unique connection with the people who use my pots.

I achieve my goal by making functional pottery as an collaborative work between me and customers. Most of my functional-ware are half complete as art. My ikibana vessel and bonsai pots are complete as art when customer put their plants. My dinnerware are complete as art when customers place their food and used in their everyday life.”
Thomas Arakawa

Edgewood Designs

Started by George Dubinsky and David Short, Edgewood brings a unique and exciting take on home-ware design standards. With background from RISD and coming from the success of George’s MFA thesis show at RIT, Edgewood was conceived. Standing for all that is just, while also ushering in a bright new era of design, Edgewood stands as it is today. Equally a design and a production company, Edgewood works with the best in the business to take design all the way from conception to production.

Eileen Sutton

“I was born and raised in New York, on Long Island. When I pierced my first piece of copper plate at age 17, I was instantly hooked. I was somewhat of a metal purist until my last semester at Tyler School of Art. It was then that I began working with cast resin. Incorporating other elements is sporadic, whereas the constant interest of resin remains. When I finished school, I stayed in Philadelphia because there was a great community of artists and craftspeople.

My first studio was in the space of the late Olaf Skoogfors, a pioneer in the field of art jewelry. It was a shared space with some graduated students from Tyler School of Art. This workspace was more than just memorable, it was an experience that paved the way for where I would go with my work.

“There is also a strong bicycling community in and around Philadelphia, which became almost equally important to me. Some of my earliest pieces were from lines I saw painted on the road while cycling. It was a thoughtful place to live. I realized then, I didn’t have to go back to N.Y.C. to get inspired.

“My forms are definitely influenced by the color and materials I use, along with what I see in the world around me. Now that I have a family, I don’t travel as far to see the world, but presently going to an aboretum or working in the garden is enough to spur some vision.”

-Eileen Sutton